Newsom responds to California Compensation Task Force recommendations

Gov. Gavin Newsom on Tuesday responded to the latest findings of California’s reparations task force, which suggested how black residents could be compensated and apologized after generations of discrimination. Part of the recommendations included payments to black Californians, with some estimates predicting the state would have to pay more than $800 billion — more than 2.5 times its annual budget — in payments. The government has already addressed the issues but has not given a clear indication whether he will withdraw the payments. “Dealing with that legacy is about more than monetary payments,” Newsom said in the statement. “This work must continue. Following the task force’s submission of its final report this summer, I look forward to continued partnership with the Legislature to advance systemic changes that ensure an inclusive and equitable future for all Californians.” The nine-member committee, which met nearly two years ago, gave final approval to a major set of plans at a meeting in Oakland on Saturday. Secretary of State Shirley Weber, a former Democratic legislator, signed legislation to create the task force in 2020. The nation at the end of the 19th century focused on the state’s historical guilt for harms against African Americans, and no substitute for additional reparations that could come from the federal government. While the group’s work attracted nationwide attention, efforts to research and secure reparations for African Americans elsewhere had mixed results.

Gov. Gavin Newsom on Tuesday responded to the latest findings of California’s reparations task force, which suggested how black residents could be compensated and apologized after generations of discrimination.

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Part of the recommendations included payments to black Californians, with some estimates predicting the state would have to pay $800 billion — more than 2.5 times its annual budget.

In a statement to KRA 3, Newsom said many of the recommendations are things the state has already addressed, but did not give a clear indication whether he would withdraw the payments.

“Dealing with that legacy is about more than cash payments,” Newsom said in the statement. “This work must continue. Following the task force’s submission of its final report this summer, I look forward to continued partnership with the Legislature to advance systemic changes that ensure an inclusive and equitable future for all Californians.”

A group of nine, first Assembled almost two years agoA meeting in Oakland on Saturday gave final approval to the big plans.

Secretary of State Shirley Weber, a former Democratic legislator, created the task force in 2020 to focus on the state’s historic accusations of harm against African Americans, and not as an alternative to more reparations that could come from the federal government.

The task force previously voted to pay reparations to descendants of enslaved or free black people in the country at the end of the 19th century.

While the group’s work has attracted nationwide attention, efforts to research and secure reparations for African Americans elsewhere have had mixed results.

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