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Planning begins for new satellite dialysis unit in Digby

On hand for the Jan. 14 announcement at the Digby Regional Hospital: Digby resident Maxine Connell, Health Minister Leo Glavine, Deep Brooke residents Joyce Anderson and Bill "Andy" Anderson, Premier Stephen McNeil, NSHA President & CEO Janet Knox and Clare-Digby MLA Gordon Wilson.
On hand for the Jan. 14 announcement at the Digby Regional Hospital: Digby resident Maxine Connell, Health Minister Leo Glavine, Deep Brooke residents Joyce Anderson and Bill "Andy" Anderson, Premier Stephen McNeil, NSHA President & CEO Janet Knox and Clare-Digby MLA Gordon Wilson.

DIGBY, N.S. – The planning stages are underway for a dialysis unit to serve patients in the Digby area instead of seeing them drive more than 100 kilometres away to Yarmouth.

The planning stages are underway for a dialysis unit to serve patients in the Digby area instead of seeing them drive more than 100 kilometres away to Yarmouth.

Premier Stephen McNeil announced Jan. 14 that the province is starting the design phase for a six-station satellite dialysis unit at the Digby General Hospital. A request-for-proposals will be issued later this month.

The Liberal government began the review of where dialysis units are located after forming government, McNeil said, and analyzing where future units could best serve the greatest number.

“There’s been a provincewide analysis of where the units are. Before we were in government there was an announcement for Kentville but there was nothing budgeted or a needs assessment done,” the premier said. “After, we found some are going from the valley to Halifax or Yarmouth. We found there would be a benefit to having units in Digby.”

The announcement for Digby General comes on the heels of a $9.1-million funding announcement to add a dialysis unit to the Valley Regional Hospital in Kentville. Construction there is expected to begin in the fall and will see 12 dialysis stations added.  The design phase for the Digby dialysis unit is expected to take about six months.

Between the Kentville and Digby commitments from government, travel times for the life-saving treatment in the area will be dramatically reduced.

The planning stages are underway for a dialysis unit to serve patients in the Digby area instead of seeing them drive more than 100 kilometres away to Yarmouth.

Premier Stephen McNeil announced Jan. 14 that the province is starting the design phase for a six-station satellite dialysis unit at the Digby General Hospital. A request-for-proposals will be issued later this month.

The Liberal government began the review of where dialysis units are located after forming government, McNeil said, and analyzing where future units could best serve the greatest number.

“There’s been a provincewide analysis of where the units are. Before we were in government there was an announcement for Kentville but there was nothing budgeted or a needs assessment done,” the premier said. “After, we found some are going from the valley to Halifax or Yarmouth. We found there would be a benefit to having units in Digby.”

The announcement for Digby General comes on the heels of a $9.1-million funding announcement to add a dialysis unit to the Valley Regional Hospital in Kentville. Construction there is expected to begin in the fall and will see 12 dialysis stations added.  The design phase for the Digby dialysis unit is expected to take about six months.

Between the Kentville and Digby commitments from government, travel times for the life-saving treatment in the area will be dramatically reduced.

Digby Regional Hospital/file photo

"Dialysis can be hard on patients and their families, especially when they have to travel frequently to receive their treatment," McNeil said. "Once established, this new dialysis unit will mean a great deal to patients who live in Digby and Annapolis counties."

The new dialysis unit will mean most patients who require hemodialysis care will be able to receive it at the Digby General Hospital and not have to travel, nor worry as much about when the weather takes a turn.

"For almost three years, I've been driving 80 minutes to get to my dialysis treatment in Yarmouth," said Bill Anderson of Deep Brook, Annapolis County. "I've only missed one appointment due to weather, but it's especially difficult during the winter months. I welcome the thought of getting treatment much closer to home."

Janet Knox, president and CEO of the Nova Scotia Health Authority, says, "With a new dialysis unit underway in Kentville and another one being designed for Digby, we are adding dialysis spaces across the province so patients who need this life-saving treatment can get it closer to home."

 

3 things to know. Hemodialysis: what is it?

1. When kidney disease or injury causes the body to lose its ability to filter or remove waste and extra fluid from the body, the process of hemodialysis – also known as dialysis – can extend a person’s life.

2. Blood is slowly pumped from the body and filtered of waste, like urea, and restores balance to electrolytes before being pumped back into the body.

3. Hemodialysis usually is done three days a week and takes three to five hours a day

Source: www.webmd.com

 

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