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Camera stolen from Maud Lewis replica house in Digby

Murray Ross built the Maud Lewis replica house in 1999 and he hasn't had any problems until now. On Aug. 6 he noticed an antique camera was stolen from Ev's Shop.
Murray Ross built the Maud Lewis replica house in 1999 and he hasn't had any problems until now. On Aug. 6 he noticed an antique camera was stolen from Ev's Shop. - Amanda Doucette

Murray Ross built the Maud Lewis Replica house in 1999 and until now, he hasn’t had any problems.

“99.9% of people who come to visit respect the property and Maud’s legacy,” he said.

The replica house is located at 11585 Highway 217 in Digby

Murray Ross in front of his Maud Lewis house replica built originally in 1999. The house sits in front of Ev’s shed, which is a replica of Everett’s workshop that was on the property and also a mailbox. SARA ERICSSON PHOTO
Murray Ross in front of his Maud Lewis house replica built originally in 1999. The house sits in front of Ev’s shed, which is a replica of Everett’s workshop that was on the property and also a mailbox. SARA ERICSSON PHOTO

The house is accompanied by a second building, Ev’s Shop. It’s a tribute to Everett Lewis’ workshop, Maud’s husband.

In the workshop Ross has several antiques on display for visitors to look at and items for sale. 

One of the antiques in the workshop, a camera that’s over 65 years old, was taken some time between Aug. 4-6.

Ross noticed the camera missing the morning of Aug. 6.

The Kodak box camera sat to the left of Ev's old tire.
The Kodak box camera sat to the left of Ev's old tire.

“The cameras been here for 19 years without a problem, I’d like to think it was taken by mistake,” he said.

The camera is an old Kodak box camera, but he doesn’t know the exact year or model.

It sat in the workshop on a shelf next to one of Ev’s old tires.

It was a staple to Ev’s Shop display and has some sentimental value to Ross.

The camera was his mothers and he remembers her using it throughout his childhood.

“Ever since I was a kid, that’s the only camera I can remember my mother using.”

The replica house and workshop are free for visitors and they can walk around as they please. Ross tries to talk to as many visitors as he can, but with many people visiting the Maud Lewis site, he doesn’t get the chance to meet them all.

“I can’t talk to them all, I wouldn’t get any of my chores done if I did,” he says.

Over the years he’s met many visitors and heard travel stories from people all over the world coming to visit his replica house.

“A lot of really nice people come here and I hope that whoever took it might realize what they’ve done and bring it back.”

On Aug. 6, Ross’ wife posted on Facebook about the camera and since then, they’ve heard from a few people who may have a similar camera that they can use for the workshop display.

The couple would still like to get their camera back and if whomever took it would like to return it, they can drop it off anonymously. No questions asked.

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