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Poppy time:  Royal Canadian Legion encourages everyone to remember

<p>Keith Stevens, first vice president of the Digby Royal Canadian Legion Branch 20, pinned Digby’s first poppy on Mayor Ben Cleveland Oct. 27.</p>
<p>Keith Stevens, first vice president of the Digby Royal Canadian Legion Branch 20, pinned Digby’s first poppy on Mayor Ben Cleveland Oct. 27.</p>

DIGBY – It’s poppy time.

Members of the Royal Canadian Legion begin selling the small red flowers every year on the last Friday in October and encourage all Canadians to wear the symbol of remembrance and sacrifice over their hearts.

Keith Stevens, the first vice president of the Digby Royal Canadian Legion Branch 20, pinned Digby’s first poppy on Mayor Ben Cleveland Oct. 27.

The Legion also sells wreaths for use in Remembrance Day ceremonies, car poppies, lapel pins and stickers.

The self-serve donation boxes are appearing in local stores and volunteers will be out and about the community.

Funds from the poppy campaign are held in trust and are used to provide financial assistance and support to currently serving and retired veterans of the Canadian Armed Forces and RCMP, and their families.

The poppy first came to be associated with the sacrifice of soldiers through the poem In Flanders Fields written by John McCrae in 1915.

The poppy officially became a symbol of remembrance in Canada in 1921.

jriley@digbycourier.ca

IN FLANDERS FIELDS

In Flanders fields the poppies blow

Between the crosses, row on row,

That mark our place; and in the sky

The larks, still bravely singing, fly

Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago

We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,

Loved and were loved, and now we lie

In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:

To you from failing hands we throw

The torch; be yours to hold it high.

If ye break faith with us who die

We shall not sleep, though poppies grow

In Flanders fields.

John McCrae, ~ 3 May 1915

(As published in Punch Magazine, 8 December 1915)

Members of the Royal Canadian Legion begin selling the small red flowers every year on the last Friday in October and encourage all Canadians to wear the symbol of remembrance and sacrifice over their hearts.

Keith Stevens, the first vice president of the Digby Royal Canadian Legion Branch 20, pinned Digby’s first poppy on Mayor Ben Cleveland Oct. 27.

The Legion also sells wreaths for use in Remembrance Day ceremonies, car poppies, lapel pins and stickers.

The self-serve donation boxes are appearing in local stores and volunteers will be out and about the community.

Funds from the poppy campaign are held in trust and are used to provide financial assistance and support to currently serving and retired veterans of the Canadian Armed Forces and RCMP, and their families.

The poppy first came to be associated with the sacrifice of soldiers through the poem In Flanders Fields written by John McCrae in 1915.

The poppy officially became a symbol of remembrance in Canada in 1921.

jriley@digbycourier.ca

IN FLANDERS FIELDS

In Flanders fields the poppies blow

Between the crosses, row on row,

That mark our place; and in the sky

The larks, still bravely singing, fly

Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago

We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,

Loved and were loved, and now we lie

In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:

To you from failing hands we throw

The torch; be yours to hold it high.

If ye break faith with us who die

We shall not sleep, though poppies grow

In Flanders fields.

John McCrae, ~ 3 May 1915

(As published in Punch Magazine, 8 December 1915)

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